AMIC® Hip

An innovative biological cartilage repair method for treating chondropathies of the acetabulum and the femoral head in the hip

  • A minimally invasive technique allows shorter hospitalisation and faster rehabilitation
  • Based on microfracturing, the established first-line treatment
  • Cost effective one-step procedure for the treatment of lesions >2 cm2, not suitable for microfracture alone
  • Protection of blood clot in a «bioactive» chamber provided by the Chondro-Gide® matrix
  • Ad hoc usage and off-the-shelf supply of Chondro-Gide®, the leading natural collagen matrix for cartilage regeneration

Chondropathies of the acetabulum and the femoral head are a frequent cause of pain and functional limitation. Moreover, if cartilage defects in the hip are not adequately repaired, progression of the damage and arthritic changes may occur. Several treatment options are available to repair chondral lesions in the hip including debridement, microfracture, autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and now the AMIC® arthroscopic hip technique.

Arthroscopic procedures are more desirable than open surgery because they are less invasive and hence reduce the risk of complications, such as infections and avascular necrosis of the femoral head and allow shorter recovery time, resulting not only in lower overall treatment cost but also higher patient satisfaction.

Indications

  • Grade III or IV chondral lesions (Outerbridge classification) on acetabulum or femoral head
  • AMIC® on acetabulum and microfracture on femoral head for kissing lesions
  • Lesion size of 2–8 cm2

 

 

 

References:

  1. Benthien JP, Behrens P. Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis (AMIC): Combining Microfracturing and a Collagen I/III Matrix for Articular Cartilage Resurfacing. Cartilage. 2010;1(1):65-8
  2. Steadman JR, Rodkey WG, Briggs KK. Microfracture to treat full-thickness chondral defects: surgical technique, rehabilitation, and outcomes. J Knee Surg. 2002;15(3):170-6
  3. Fontana A. A novel technique for treating cartilage defects in the hip: a fully arthroscopic approach to using autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis. Arthrosc Tech. 2012 Apr 21;1(1):E63-8
  4. Fuss M, Ehlers EM, Russlies M, Rohwedel J, Behrens P. Characteristics of human chondrocytes, osteoblasts and fibroblasts seeded onto a type I/III collagen sponge under different culture conditions. A light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy study. Ann Anat. 2000 Jul;182(4):303-10
  5. Dickhut A, Dexheimer V, Martin K, Lauinger R, Heisel C, Richter W. Chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells by local transforming growth factor-beta delivery in a biphasic resorbable carrier. Tissue Eng Part A. 2010 Feb;16(2):453-64
  6. Yen YM, Kocher MS. Chondral lesions of the hip: Microfracture and chondroplasty. Sports Med Arthrosc. 2010 Jun;18(2):83-9
  7. Fontana A, Bistolfi A, Crova M, Rosso F, Massazza G. Arthroscopic treatment of hip chondral defects: autologous chondrocytetransplantation versus simple debridement--a pilot study. Arthroscopy. 2012 Mar;28(3):322-9
  8. Botser IB, Smith TW Jr, Nasser R, Domb BG. Open surgical dislocation versus arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement: a comparison of clinical outcomes. Arthroscopy. 2011 Feb;27(2):270-8

 

 

 

 

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Dr. Sanja Saftic
International Product Manager